The Turning Of The Tide

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Götterdämmerung : Brexit, Blair, and the Hungarian referendum

There were parts of Tony Blair’s public response to the Chilcot report that seemed to put the modern observer in visceral contact with the mediæval sense of the damned soul. There was no joy in this for anyone, only vindication. Watching, sickened, Don Antonio’s descent into what must surely now be his personal, inescapable hell, one should remember — as pointed out by Brendan O’Neill in Spiked — that Blair takes with him in spirit the sycophants and lazy thinkers everywhere who in 2003 let him fall in with Bush’s fraudulent, catastrophic, and — like Hitler’s — personal war, on Iraq. The very same who, from the rubble of New Labour, now express satisfaction at his demise. For them, Blair’s purpose was to conduct away evil; to suck it up like some great exculpatory siphon, while injecting a tracer all his own.

Blair’s purpose was to conduct away evil; to suck it up like some great exculpatory siphon, while injecting a tracer all his own.

After Brexit, which will be played out in some form with or without the invocation of Article 50, then the Chilcot report, a third broadside against the institutions of arbitrary power in Europe is scheduled for the 2nd October: the Hungarian referendum targeting Brussels’ dead-letter diktat on the shared settlement of refugees throughout the Union.

At this point in Europe’s long, cold civil war between its diverse indigenous peoples and the network of elites that has entrenched itself beyond their democratic control, it is tempting at last to register the turning of the tide. There is a premonitory line in Richard Wagner’s Das Rheingold: “Those who believe themselves so long enduring, are hastening towards their end.” For the sake of Europe’s cultural survival, let it be devoutly wished.