François Fillon v. The Media

François Fillon v. The Media

If the breath of life could be cornered, it would go the way of the other commons: clinging to the hands of private interests. Media oligarchs have made similar attempts to privatise public opinion. Why exercise the faculties of thought and judgement when the makers of ersatz opinion are there with a ready product? The ❛Party of the Media❜ is relentless in its attempt to seize the democratic commons of public debate, then sell it back to voters in the form of a cut lunch. So it was, before Brexit, before Donald Trump, and now before the trouncing of the media favourite, Alain Juppé, in the first round of the French primary to select a presidential candidate for the Right and the Centre. On all three occasions, the media’s instructions were ignored and the pollsters cuckolded. It must by now be obvious that it is a citizen’s democratic duty to lie convincingly to pollsters, and if possible to put them out of business, because their only function in elections is to pervert the expression of the public will.

Maxime Tandonnet, a former advisor to Nicolas Sarkozy, comments on M. Fillon’s ❛surprise❜ success in Le Figaro.

It’s interesting that FIGAROVOX introduces François Fillon as le Sarthois, a reference to his origins in the department of the Sarthe in north-west France. We are unlikely to see a gauchiste newspaper evoke domesticity in this way, as the Left regards such notions of home and origin as somehow subversive. And with good reason: they are conservative and discriminatory concepts, with no place in Utopia.

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Neoliberalism: The End Of All That Went Before

Neoliberalism: The End Of All That Went Before

Former prime ministers of France are a teeming species, of which Dominique de Villepin is a member. He occupied the office, 2005-7, during the presidency of Jacques Chirac. His new book, Memories of Peace for a Time of War, is the background to an interview with Vincent Tremolet de Villers in Le Figaro, published on 13th November, and entitled French diplomacy has met an impasse. Here, in extracts from the interview, are some of de Villepin’s insights into the First World ideology that depends for its continued existence, precariously, on the integrity of all the “End Of” theories relentlessly piled up by the prophets. Neoliberalism.

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The Beatitudes of The Left

The Beatitudes of The Left

Here, from the official website of the socialist deputy (Loire-Atlantique), Monique Rabin, is the conscience and negotiating position of the French extreme Left in its purest form. Unless The Europeans has been gulled mercilessly by an online hoax, it preserves intact the holy writ of French revolutionary sentiment: that the Empire perish, but that its values endure… No country on earth, as it now seems, is more deeply mired in its own humanitarian ‘values’ than France.

Unless it is Germany. The common governing sentiment of these two exceptional countries has finally led Europe over the brink into full view of ultimate demographic extinction. Self-extinguishing values are no values at all, but this black irony is forever lost on the European Left. In France, during the present politically consanguineous tenure of president François Hollande and prime ministers Jean-Marc Ayrault, then Manuel Valls, the Parti socialiste has become crazed by fissures both deep and delicate, and paralyzed…..well, by paralysis. The general mood in the country now runs bitterly counter to the high moral sentiments of Mme Rabin, as expressed in her atavistic appeal to socialist purity: an appeal whose echo from government grows weaker by the hour, and must inevitably disappear altogether.

Mme Rabin’s open and unlimited invitation to migrants to come to France is larded in the original with intimate thou-thines, while she dismisses the French taxpayers who must shoulder the huge burden without complaint as the ugly face of France. French SDF, the sans domicile fixe, receive no mention at all, although it is certain that pressure from immigration is acting to slow or perhaps even stall their own migration from the streets into social housing. Such, in France, is the Left’s haine de soi [self-contempt], not to mention its sweet companion, self-satisfaction, so lovingly dissected in this remarkable contribution to national suicide.

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