Neoliberalism: The End Of All That Went Before

Neoliberalism: The End Of All That Went Before

Former prime ministers of France are a teeming species, of which Dominique de Villepin is a member. He occupied the office, 2005-7, during the presidency of Jacques Chirac. His new book, Memories of Peace for a Time of War, is the background to an interview with Vincent Tremolet de Villers in Le Figaro, published on 13th November, and entitled French diplomacy has met an impasse. Here, in extracts from the interview, are some of de Villepin’s insights into the First World ideology that depends for its continued existence, precariously, on the integrity of all the “End Of” theories relentlessly piled up by the prophets. Neoliberalism.

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How To Be A Conservative

How To Be A Conservative

logo_caesar_35pxRoger Scruton’s little book of lucid prose, How To Be A Conservative, is his first work to have been translated into French. Extracts from De l’urgence d’être conservateur were recently published in Le Figaro under the introduction, Our heritage is also the property of those who have not yet been born. “Although Roger Scruton is a prominent figure in the intellectual life of Britain, he is little known in France. None of his books had been translated into French until Les Éditions de l’Artilleur repaired the omission. Rich, nourishing, stimulating, like the most captivating of conversations, this essay offers a rare pleasure: to explore the sharpness and depth of an intellectual position.”

The Europeans Book Review. In How To Be A Conservative, Scruton leaves a coherent intellectual trail. But the scent crosses a river and gets lost when he appears to genuflect before one of the great shibboleths of Leftist orthodoxy: the independence of race and culture.

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Michel Houellebecq in Berlin

Michel Houellebecq in Berlin

The important thing about Michel Houellebecq is his part in liberating French intellectuals from the New Terror of the socialist media and, since 2012, the governing Parti socialiste: that is, those intellectuals who wished to be freed. What they can practically do with their new freedom remains to be seen, as demographic change in Europe continues to bulldoze nice philosophical categories, precisely as outlined in Houellebecq’s novel, Soumission [Submission].

Houellebecq was recently in Berlin to receive a literary prize. His acceptance speech was delivered in French, but The Europeans, having been unable to locate a transcript, has provided here a translation from the Neue Zürcher Zeitung‘s German version. In other words, the text — an abridged version of the speech — has been laundered twice: with what result, the reader will judge. We learn most, of course, when authors speak for themselves, outside of their writerly personæ, and that is why the present labour has been undertaken.

Submission was, and is, important because it was not to much launched, as detonated. It still reverberates throughout French intellectual and media circles, with little fumaroles of outrage appearing here and there in the landscape. What fun it must have been, to crack so many heads.

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