Kramp-Karrenbauer Takes the Chairmanship of the CDU

Kramp-Karrenbauer Takes the Chairmanship of the CDU

The three candidates : Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, Friedrich Merz, Jens Spahn (seated)

As reported by Cicero Magazine, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer (“AKK”) succeeded Angela Merkel as chairman of the Christian Democratic Union, at the party conference, 7th December. The victory was narrow, and went to a second round run-off election between Kramp-Karrenbauer and Merz.

First round results: AKK 45%, FM 39.2%, JS 15.7%
Second round: AKK 51.75%, FM 48.25%

The final result was uncannily close to that of the Brexit referendum — Leave 51.89%, Remain, 48.11% — although in the opposite sense. AKK, the anointed of Angela Merkel, will be counted upon to provide transitional stability, allowing the Chancellor to remain more or less comfortably in her post until the 2021 Bundestag elections. The right-wing Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) will no doubt be welcoming the result. AKK, the Merkel-protégée, will be far less likely than Friedrich Merz, the Schäuble-protégé, to win back voters lost to the AfD in 2017 over the principal national issue: immigration policy. Add to that the piquant sauce served up by the narrowness of the Merkel-AKK win.

Paradigm Shift

Paradigm Shift

A few years ago, a contributor to The London Review of Books wrote, “For the first time in its history, the European Left no longer has a project“. Not so: the Left has never lacked a project. When it divorced its white working-class constituency, it did so in order to channel its passion into the greatest of all social projects: to make amends for colonialism and WWII by declaring all accidents of birth, wherever they might be found, null and void. Redress could be had simply by migrating to Europe.

Continue reading “Paradigm Shift”

Where are they now?

Where are they now?

CICERO MAGAZINE : A study examines the role of the media during the migrant crisis. The alarming conclusion: the media appointed themselves as the mouthpiece of the political elite and ignored the people’s concerns. The consequences are disastrous, and not only for journalism.

Pictures from autumn 2015: happy people at Munich’s central station holding “Refugees Welcome” placards high, teddybears flying through the air, colourful balloons rising into the sky, the columns of refugees rapturously applauded. Germany, so it seemed, was in the grip of collective welcome-hysteria. Particularly affected by this feeling were the leading media, who virtually rolled over to declare a Willkommenskultur public holiday — if not yet actually in force, then to be demanded. Continue reading “Where are they now?”